Hovering Cars? Bring it on Toyota!

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The tech gurus over at Toyota are working on something revolutionary. Are we really about to see the introduction of cars that hover above the road – flying cars?

It seems that Toyota is no longer content just producing fantastic automobiles. Although should we really be surprised? After all, the company has asserted itself as one of the top automakers in the world and has been responsible for many great motoring industry advancements.

For example, they are widely recognised as one of the biggest contributors to hybrid technology and with Audi and Google, they are seriously testing cars that drive themselves.

But now, the Japanese firm has hinted that hovering cars could actually become a reality.

Before you get too excited, it should be highlighted that the idea is to produce cars that will hover just above the surface of the road and not Jetsons-esque flying cars.

Much like a hovercraft, Toyota’s hovering cars will, in theory, benefit from reduced friction and, therefore, could produce some fantastic fuel savings.

The announcement about the exciting new technology was made by Toyota’s Managing Officer Hiroyoshi Yoshiki at Bloomberg’s Next Big Thing Summit in San Francisco.

The full details are still very hush hush and Yoshiki wasn’t giving too much away. He did, however, disclose that the concept of a hovering car was being focussed on at one of its “most advanced” research and development areas.

Here at JDMRacing, we’re obviously very intrigued about such ground-breaking technology, but we’re still going to wait for more information to be released before we get too excited.

After all, cars need a certain amount of friction to help them go, stop and corner. Furthermore, to get something to literally fly requires a lot of energy and significant speed. There’s a reason that jet aircraft have those enormous engines right?

The post Hovering Cars? Bring it on Toyota! appeared first on JDMRACING.


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